Difference between revisions of "Frankreichfeldzug (LFS07498)"

 
(6 intermediate revisions by 3 users not shown)
Line 9: Line 9:
 
|coloration=Noir_et_blanc
 
|coloration=Noir_et_blanc
 
|son=Muet
 
|son=Muet
|timecode=00:05:15
+
|timecode=00:00:00
|duree=00:05:15
+
|duree=00:03:43
 
|genre=Film_amateur
 
|genre=Film_amateur
 
|format_original=16 mm
 
|format_original=16 mm
Line 16: Line 16:
 
|Etat_redaction=Non
 
|Etat_redaction=Non
 
|Etat_publication=Non
 
|Etat_publication=Non
 +
|apercu=LFS07498_Frankreichfeldzug.jpg
 
|lieux_ou_monuments=Strasbourg
 
|lieux_ou_monuments=Strasbourg
 
|lieuTournage=48.58325, 7.75095
 
|lieuTournage=48.58325, 7.75095
 
|thematique=Borders@ War@ Second World War : German occupation - Annexation of Alsace
 
|thematique=Borders@ War@ Second World War : German occupation - Annexation of Alsace
 +
|Resume_en=Soldiers of German Wehrmacht in Strasbourg visiting the Cathedral. Loading of confiscated consumer goods and household items on trucks.
 
|Resume_de=Soldaten der deutschen Wehrmacht in Straßburg: u.a. Besichtigung des Straßburger Münster; Verladen von beschlagnahmten Gebrauchsgütern und Hausrat auf Lastwagen.
 
|Resume_de=Soldaten der deutschen Wehrmacht in Straßburg: u.a. Besichtigung des Straßburger Münster; Verladen von beschlagnahmten Gebrauchsgütern und Hausrat auf Lastwagen.
 +
|Description_en=German Soldiers visit the Strasbourg Cathedral; Pan across the city; Driving with a car through the city; Soldiers load bicycles from a truck; Soldier, in the background bridge; Driving cars over a makeshift bridge; Pan across war-torn houses; Pan through interior (dark); Room with confiscated household items; Soldier drags sewing machine; Soldiers load trucks with household items; Officer and soldiers in front of a building; L'Aubette, Place Kleber with monument by Jean-Baptiste Kleber; Schild <Advice center of the NSDAP Dep. Mother and  Child>; Office, men at desk; Soldiers get in car; Pan through office (dark); Sign <parlor>; Swivel through room with bed and sink; Soldiers with spades go across the yard; Shield <field post office No 33971>; Soldier as a guard at the entrance to a factory; Soldiers with spades; Men with bare torso at work; Soldier caresses dog; Interior (dark).
 
|Description_de=Soldaten besichtigen das Straßburger Münster; Schwenk über die Stadt; Fahrtaufnahme aus dem Auto; Soldaten laden Fahrräder von einem Lastwagen; Soldat, im Hintergrund Brücke; Fahrt von Autos über eine Behelfsbrücke; Schwenk über kriegszerstörte Häuser; Schwenk durch Innenraum (dunkel); Raum mit beschlagnahmtem Hausrat; Soldat schleppt Nähmaschine; Soldaten beladen Lastwagen mit Hausrat (v.E.);  
 
|Description_de=Soldaten besichtigen das Straßburger Münster; Schwenk über die Stadt; Fahrtaufnahme aus dem Auto; Soldaten laden Fahrräder von einem Lastwagen; Soldat, im Hintergrund Brücke; Fahrt von Autos über eine Behelfsbrücke; Schwenk über kriegszerstörte Häuser; Schwenk durch Innenraum (dunkel); Raum mit beschlagnahmtem Hausrat; Soldat schleppt Nähmaschine; Soldaten beladen Lastwagen mit Hausrat (v.E.);  
 
TC: 10:12:01:17:  
 
TC: 10:12:01:17:  
 
Offizier und Soldaten vor einem Gebäude; L'Aubette, Place Kleber mit Denkmal von Jean-Baptiste Kleber; Schild <Beratungsstelle der NSDAP Abt. Mutter u. Kind>; Büro, Männer am Schreibtisch; Soldaten steigen in Auto ein; Schwenk durch Büro (dunkel); Schild <Heilstube>; Schwenk durch Raum mit Bett und Waschbecken; Soldaten mit Spaten gehen über Hof; Schild <Dienststelle der Feldpost No 33971>; Soldat als Wache am Eingang einer Fabrik; Soldaten mit Spaten; Männer mit entblößtem Oberkörper bei der Arbeit; Soldat streichelt Hund; Innenraum (dunkel). //
 
Offizier und Soldaten vor einem Gebäude; L'Aubette, Place Kleber mit Denkmal von Jean-Baptiste Kleber; Schild <Beratungsstelle der NSDAP Abt. Mutter u. Kind>; Büro, Männer am Schreibtisch; Soldaten steigen in Auto ein; Schwenk durch Büro (dunkel); Schild <Heilstube>; Schwenk durch Raum mit Bett und Waschbecken; Soldaten mit Spaten gehen über Hof; Schild <Dienststelle der Feldpost No 33971>; Soldat als Wache am Eingang einer Fabrik; Soldaten mit Spaten; Männer mit entblößtem Oberkörper bei der Arbeit; Soldat streichelt Hund; Innenraum (dunkel). //
 +
|Contexte_et_analyse_en=A facade looms in the semi-darkness until the pan ends on the church tower. It is the west facade of the Strasbourg Cathedral, whose Gothic forms are condensed in an upward striving. The camera seems to repeat this movement, but what initially appears to be ambiguous in the abundance of the facade pattern quickly turns out to be a gesture of the winner: German soldiers have occupied Strasbourg - the image of the cathedral as well as the view from the tower then become a trophy in the visual.
 +
 +
Driving through the city also becomes a gesture of power: the cyclists in front of the military car are virtually targeted through the windshield. Cinematic techniques have their origins in military techniques that served to clarify the terrain - this thesis by Paul Virillio is vividly understandable in this short amateur film from the western campaign, which began on May 10, 1940 and ended a few weeks later, on June 22, with the Capitulation of France.
 +
 +
On September 1, 1939, the Second World War began with the attack by the German Wehrmacht on Poland. France and Great Britain then declared war on the German Reich, but this was followed by a period of the 'seat war', during which the warring parties only observed each other. On May 10, 1940, the "Fall Yellow", planned by Hitler and his general staff, occurred, the invasion of German troops in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The "Fall Red" followed at the beginning of June: In a blitzkrieg with combined tank and air operations, the Germans proved superior to the Allied defense strategy and already took Paris on 14 June. The Compiègne armistice was closed on June 22.
 +
 +
The Liebfrauenmünster in Strasbourg, which attracted the attention of the German occupiers in 1940, is one of the most important cathedrals in the history of architecture. Built from the red sandstone from the Vosges between 1176 and 1439, the building was first designed in the Romanesque, then in the Gothic style. With its 142 meter high north tower, the cathedral was the tallest building in the world from 1647 to 1874 and the tallest building completed in the Middle Ages. The young Johann Wolfgang Goethe saw his view of true art realized in Liebfrauenmünster and in 1773 dedicated his essay "Von Deutscher Baukunst" (From German Art of Construction) to one of the church's architects, Erwin von Steinbach.
 +
 +
Strasbourg had been evacuated at the beginning of the Second World War. Until the occupation by the Wehrmacht troops in June 1940, apart from barracked soldiers, there was no one in the city. The sea of ​​houses of this abandoned city glides past in the view from above and finally binds itself to the view of soldiers, who can be seen in rear view, standing on top of the church tower. Images become prey: images in which the visible becomes an object, as well as in the cityscapes, which flit past in the car and curdle again and again into total shots: a flight of streets with cranes, the Rhine landscape, a makeshift bridge and ruins of destroyed houses. But for a few seconds the city also appears as a picture within a picture, taken through two openings in a dark room - and eludes the 'male' view of the victors by disappearing almost in the distance.
 +
 +
The claim of the documentary becomes noticeable when it is now the turn of the accommodations: the lounge with the fully occupied tables and the sleeping places, carefully turned away. When trucks are unloaded, more and more looted goods are carried towards the camera. The semi-darkness that envelops the scene - in the hall with the abundance of things piled up, this "picture" of a looting appears even more than what it is.
 +
 +
The Nazi state was essentially a new form of administrative control over life, which is now establishing itself in the occupied country. Multiple pans go through dark rooms that are not specially illuminated for shooting. It shows the uniformed figures at the desks like in a Kafkaesque scenery. Recordings of the "Heilstube", the ambulance room, develop into a small scenic sequence, in which a cut on the gesticulating patient in bed is framed by glances at the supervisor in the anteroom.
 +
 +
Not only in the interiors, the pictures always have surreal features, also in the courtyard of the “Feldpost No. 33971 ”borders the documentary with the fictional. A pan glides over a row of standing soldiers, a front view shows the lounge area with field kitchen like a film set in geometric shapes. And the soldier who lovingly pats the dog in front of his hut is part of the fiction that the National Socialists designed of himself - shown in an amateur film that documents the occupation of Strasbourg. Reiner Bader
 +
|Contexte_et_analyse_de=Eine Fassade zeichnet sich ab im Halbdunkel, bis der Schwenk auf dem Kirchturm endet. Es ist die Westfassade des Straßburger Münsters, deren gotische Formen sich in einem Aufwärtsstreben verdichten. Die Kamera scheint diese Bewegung zu wiederholen, doch was zunächst noch mehrdeutig erscheint in der Fülle des Fassadenmusters, erweist sich schnell als Geste des Siegers: deutsche Soldaten haben Straßburg besetzt – das Bild des Münsters wie dann der Blick vom Turm herab werden zur Trophäe im Visuellen. 
 +
 +
Auch das Fahren durch die Stadt wird zur Machtgeste: Die Radfahrer vor dem Militärwagen geraten durch die Windschutzscheibe geradezu ins Visier. Filmische Techniken haben ihren Ursprung in militärischen Techniken, die dazu dienten, das Gelände aufzuklären – diese These wird anschaulich nachvollziehbar in diesem kurzen Amateurfilm aus dem Westfeldzug, der am 10. Mai 1940 begann und bereits einige Wochen später, am 22. Juni, mit der Kapitulation Frankreichs endete.
 +
 +
Am 1. September 1939 hatte mit dem Überfall der deutschen Wehrmacht auf Polen der Zweite Weltkrieg begonnen. Frankreich und Großbritannien erklärten dem Deutschen Reich daraufhin den Krieg, es folgte jedoch zunächst eine Periode des Sitzkriegs, während der die Kriegsparteien sich nur beobachteten. Am 10. Mai 1940 trat der von Hitler und seinem Generalstab geplante „Fall Gelb“ ein, der Einmarsch deutscher Truppen in Belgien, den Niederlanden und Luxembourg. Der „Fall Rot“ schloss sich Anfang Juni an: In einem Blitzkrieg mit kombiniertem Panzer- und Lufteinsatz erwiesen sich die Deutschen der alliierten Verteidigungsstrategie als überlegen und nahmen bereits am 14. Juni Paris ein. Am 22. Juni wurde der Waffenstillstand von Compiègne geschlossen.
 +
 +
Das Liebfrauenmünster in Straßburg, das 1940 die Blicke der deutschen Besatzer auf sich zieht, gehört zu den bedeutendsten Kathedralen der Architekturgeschichte. Von 1176 bis 1439 aus Vogesensandstein errichtet, wurde der Bau zunächst im romanischen, dann im gotischen Stil gestaltet. Mit seinem 142 Meter hohen Nordturm war das Münster von 1647 bis 1874 das höchste Bauwerk der Welt und das höchste im Mittelalter fertig gestellte Gebäude. Der junge Johann Wolfgang Goethe sah im Liebfrauenmünster seine Auffassung von wahrer Kunst verwirklicht und widmete 1773 seinen Aufsatz „Von Deutscher Baukunst“ einem der Architekten der Kirche, Erwin von Steinbach.
 +
Straßburg war mit Beginn des Zweiten Weltkriegs evakuiert worden. Bis zur Besetzung durch die Wehrmachtstruppen im Juni 1940 befand sich abgesehen von kasernierten Soldaten niemand in der Stadt. Das Häusermeer dieser verlassenen Stadt gleitet vorüber in der Sicht von oben und bindet sich schließlich an den Blick von Soldaten, die in Rückansicht zu sehen sind, oben auf dem Kirchturm stehend. Bilder werden zur Beute: Abbilder, in denen das Sichtbare zum Objekt wird, so wie auch in den Stadtansichten, die im Auto verwackelt vorbei huschen und immer wieder zu Totalaufnahmen gerinnen: eine Straßenflucht mit Kränen, die Rheinlandschaft, eine Behelfsbrücke und Ruinen von zerstörten Häusern. Doch für Sekunden erscheint die Stadt auch als Bild im Bild, aufgenommen durch zwei Öffnungen in einem dunklen Raum – und entzieht sich dem „männlichen“ Blick der Sieger, indem sie nahezu in der Ferne verschwindet.
 +
 +
Der Anspruch des Dokumentarischen macht sich bemerkbar, wenn nun die Unterkünfte an der Reihe sind: der Aufenthaltsraum mit den vollbesetzten Tischen und die Schlafplätze, gewissenhaft abgeschwenkt. Bei einer Entladung von Lastwägen werden mehr und mehr geplünderte Güter der Kamera entgegengetragen. Das Halbdunkel, das die Szene einhüllt – in der Halle mit der Überfülle der angehäuften Dinge lässt es dieses ‚Bild‘ einer Plünderung umso mehr als das erscheinen, was es ist.
 +
 +
Der NS-Staat war wesentlich eine neue Form administrativer Kontrolle des Lebens, die sich nun im besetzten Land etabliert. Mehrfach geht ein Schwenk durch dunkle Räume, die für die Aufnahme nicht extra ausgeleuchtet sind. Darin zeichnen sich die uniformierten Gestalten an den Schreibtischen ab wie in einer kafkaesken Szenerie. Aufnahmen von der „Heilstube“, dem Krankenzimmer, entwickeln sich zu einem kleinen szenischen Ablauf, bei dem ein Schnitt auf den gestikulierenden Kranken im Bett von Blicken auf die Aufsichtsperson im Vorraum eingerahmt wird.
 +
 +
Nicht nur in den Innenräumen gewinnen die Bilder immer wieder surreale Züge, auch auf dem Hof der „Dienststelle Feldpost No. 33971“ grenzt das Dokumentarische an das Fiktionale. Ein Schwenk gleitet über eine Reihe stillstehender Soldaten, eine Frontalaufnahme zeigt den Aufenthaltsbereich mit Feldküche wie ein Filmset in geometrischen Formen. Und der Soldat, der den Hund vor seiner Hütte liebevoll tätschelt, ist Teil der Fiktion, die die Nationalsozialisten von sich selbst entwarfen – vorgeführt in einem Amateurfilm, der die Besetzung Straßburgs dokumentiert. Reiner Bader
 +
|Bibliographie=Virilio, Paul: Krieg und Kino. Logistik der Wahrnehmung, Frankfurt / M. 1989.
 +
 +
Straßburger Münster (https://de.m.wikipedia.org).
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 12:16, 10 February 2020


Warning[1]

Abstract


Soldiers of German Wehrmacht in Strasbourg visiting the Cathedral. Loading of confiscated consumer goods and household items on trucks.

Description


German Soldiers visit the Strasbourg Cathedral; Pan across the city; Driving with a car through the city; Soldiers load bicycles from a truck; Soldier, in the background bridge; Driving cars over a makeshift bridge; Pan across war-torn houses; Pan through interior (dark); Room with confiscated household items; Soldier drags sewing machine; Soldiers load trucks with household items; Officer and soldiers in front of a building; L'Aubette, Place Kleber with monument by Jean-Baptiste Kleber; Schild <Advice center of the NSDAP Dep. Mother and Child>; Office, men at desk; Soldiers get in car; Pan through office (dark); Sign <parlor>; Swivel through room with bed and sink; Soldiers with spades go across the yard; Shield <field post office No 33971>; Soldier as a guard at the entrance to a factory; Soldiers with spades; Men with bare torso at work; Soldier caresses dog; Interior (dark).

Metadata

Reference / film number :  LFS07498
Date :  1940
Coloration :  Black and white
Sound :  Mute
Running time :  00:03:43
Reel format :  16 mm
Genre :  Amateur movie
Thematics :  Borders, War, Second World War : German occupation - Annexation of Alsace
Archive :  Haus des Dokumentarfilms

Context and analysis


A facade looms in the semi-darkness until the pan ends on the church tower. It is the west facade of the Strasbourg Cathedral, whose Gothic forms are condensed in an upward striving. The camera seems to repeat this movement, but what initially appears to be ambiguous in the abundance of the facade pattern quickly turns out to be a gesture of the winner: German soldiers have occupied Strasbourg - the image of the cathedral as well as the view from the tower then become a trophy in the visual.

Driving through the city also becomes a gesture of power: the cyclists in front of the military car are virtually targeted through the windshield. Cinematic techniques have their origins in military techniques that served to clarify the terrain - this thesis by Paul Virillio is vividly understandable in this short amateur film from the western campaign, which began on May 10, 1940 and ended a few weeks later, on June 22, with the Capitulation of France.

On September 1, 1939, the Second World War began with the attack by the German Wehrmacht on Poland. France and Great Britain then declared war on the German Reich, but this was followed by a period of the 'seat war', during which the warring parties only observed each other. On May 10, 1940, the "Fall Yellow", planned by Hitler and his general staff, occurred, the invasion of German troops in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The "Fall Red" followed at the beginning of June: In a blitzkrieg with combined tank and air operations, the Germans proved superior to the Allied defense strategy and already took Paris on 14 June. The Compiègne armistice was closed on June 22.

The Liebfrauenmünster in Strasbourg, which attracted the attention of the German occupiers in 1940, is one of the most important cathedrals in the history of architecture. Built from the red sandstone from the Vosges between 1176 and 1439, the building was first designed in the Romanesque, then in the Gothic style. With its 142 meter high north tower, the cathedral was the tallest building in the world from 1647 to 1874 and the tallest building completed in the Middle Ages. The young Johann Wolfgang Goethe saw his view of true art realized in Liebfrauenmünster and in 1773 dedicated his essay "Von Deutscher Baukunst" (From German Art of Construction) to one of the church's architects, Erwin von Steinbach.

Strasbourg had been evacuated at the beginning of the Second World War. Until the occupation by the Wehrmacht troops in June 1940, apart from barracked soldiers, there was no one in the city. The sea of ​​houses of this abandoned city glides past in the view from above and finally binds itself to the view of soldiers, who can be seen in rear view, standing on top of the church tower. Images become prey: images in which the visible becomes an object, as well as in the cityscapes, which flit past in the car and curdle again and again into total shots: a flight of streets with cranes, the Rhine landscape, a makeshift bridge and ruins of destroyed houses. But for a few seconds the city also appears as a picture within a picture, taken through two openings in a dark room - and eludes the 'male' view of the victors by disappearing almost in the distance.

The claim of the documentary becomes noticeable when it is now the turn of the accommodations: the lounge with the fully occupied tables and the sleeping places, carefully turned away. When trucks are unloaded, more and more looted goods are carried towards the camera. The semi-darkness that envelops the scene - in the hall with the abundance of things piled up, this "picture" of a looting appears even more than what it is.

The Nazi state was essentially a new form of administrative control over life, which is now establishing itself in the occupied country. Multiple pans go through dark rooms that are not specially illuminated for shooting. It shows the uniformed figures at the desks like in a Kafkaesque scenery. Recordings of the "Heilstube", the ambulance room, develop into a small scenic sequence, in which a cut on the gesticulating patient in bed is framed by glances at the supervisor in the anteroom.

Not only in the interiors, the pictures always have surreal features, also in the courtyard of the “Feldpost No. 33971 ”borders the documentary with the fictional. A pan glides over a row of standing soldiers, a front view shows the lounge area with field kitchen like a film set in geometric shapes. And the soldier who lovingly pats the dog in front of his hut is part of the fiction that the National Socialists designed of himself - shown in an amateur film that documents the occupation of Strasbourg. Reiner Bader

Places and monuments


Strasbourg

Bibliography


Virilio, Paul: Krieg und Kino. Logistik der Wahrnehmung, Frankfurt / M. 1989.

Straßburger Münster (https://de.m.wikipedia.org).



  1. This film analysis is still in progress. It may therefore be incomplete and contain errors.