Difference between revisions of "Sport und Fasnacht (LFS00472 1)"

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ZT: Von der Lohrer Fasnet  
 
ZT: Von der Lohrer Fasnet  
 
Fasnachtsumzug in Lahr, von erhöhter Position gefilmt. Kamel, Wagen mit Darstellung eines Boxkampfs, Boot mit Aufschrift "Skihaserl".
 
Fasnachtsumzug in Lahr, von erhöhter Position gefilmt. Kamel, Wagen mit Darstellung eines Boxkampfs, Boot mit Aufschrift "Skihaserl".
 +
|Contexte_et_analyse_en=he amateur film deals with two different subjects, which were recorded separately. The first minute is about a sports performance by a men and women team from the Lahr gymnastics club on the Schlossplatz. The second minute is followed by recordings of the carnival parade in 1937. At the beginning of the film there is a plaque "Lahr, the city of the limping messenger". This name refers to the folk calendar 'Lahrer Linkender Bote', which appeared from 1800 and has since been published with the subtitle "The Baden Calendar". The main title refers to the fact that around 1800 invalids often only had the opportunity to make a living as messengers or newspaper sellers. The content consists of a calendar, information on memorial days, planting and sowing dates, farmers' rules, pollen count, the centenary calendar, country-specific articles and stories, some in Alemannic dialect, as well as photos and drawings.
 +
Sports exercises
 +
All recordings of the sports performances took place in today's Schlossplatz from the same position without a tripod. The Karl Erber furniture store, which can be seen in the background, has now become a branch of a drugstore chain and enables localization. Gymnastics became very popular with the advent of the labor movement in the second half of the 19th century. The Lahr gymnastics club was founded in 1846 and is one of the oldest gymnastics clubs in Baden-Württemberg. Today, with almost 2,000 members, it is the largest club that offers sports in Lahr. The young women in short sports dress with the club's logo perform choreographed and synchronized gymnastics and dance exercises with small balls. Afterwards, old men show gymnastic exercises with leather slingshots that they throw at each other. In the background, many children and some adults can be seen as spectators, including a soldier in uniform and a policeman who keeps the youngsters at bay. Some of them are lightly dressed and in combination with the position of the sun and the resulting shadows, the sporting performance can be dated to the midday in spring; the year of admission remains unclear, but will be in the second half of the 1930s. At the end of this sequence, the camera pans from left to right and follows the march of the men with their shouldered balls.
 +
Carnival parade
 +
The sequence begins with a plaque "Von der Lohrer Fasnet" and shows the move on Sunday, February 7, as evidenced by an article in the Lahrer Zeitung on February 8, 1937: "'So ebbs has never been there!' Flow of people, which rolled from the whole circle into the official city of the Lahr Fasentzunft, clogged the streets long before the Fasentzug through the main street of the city led its huge queue of wit and satire through. " The article makes it clear that many clubs and music groups from Lahr and the neighboring towns participated in the move. Not all of the numbers the article mentions are documented in the very short film of less than a minute. The amateur filmmaker with his 16 mm camera has chosen an elevated position and lets the train pass him by. The images are somewhat blurred. The film was shot without a tripod and cut in the camera, so to speak, by stopping it and starting it again on the next subject.
 +
 +
You can see the Klepperlesgard, the city chapel and the civil militia Lahr, which were closely connected to the carnival. This was followed by the guild council on a gala car and a motive car to tunnel the Schutterlindenberg. Two of them are walking in camel costumes, which the article comments: "'When an grass has finally grown over an old thing, a camel will surely come running that will tear everything down again' - the 'Liederkranz' Lahr embodied the sewerage concerns of the population." (LZ, 8.2.1937). A ring is built on another car, in which two boxers fight with each other. Reference was made to the fight of the German boxing star Max Schmeling against Joe Jacobs on June 19, 1936 in New York, which the German won after twelve rounds. Under the motto "If we don't have snow, we go to sea", the ski club on the ship 'Skihaserl' enjoyed itself. The main street is densely filled with audiences, which are mostly not disguised except for the children. This can be attributed to the fact that this move was only the second official one in Lahr. Before that, the fools mostly celebrated in closed rooms, because at the beginning of the 20th century Lahr was predominantly Protestant and the carnival was officially prohibited. Nevertheless, a move was secretly carried out in what was then "Kriz-Gass", today's Gärtnerstrasse, and the community tolerated it. In 1936, the first official carnival parade was carried out in Lahr.
 +
Patrizia Danielczok, Alexander Just, Keshia-Magali Kaltenbrunner, Jenny Wybierski
 
|Contexte_et_analyse_de=Der Amateurfilm behandelt zwei unterschiedliche Sujets, die zeitlich getrennt aufgenommen wurden. In der ersten Minute geht es um eine Sportdarbietung von einer Männer- und einer Frauenriege des Turnverein Lahr auf dem Schlossplatz. In der zweiten Minute folgen dann Aufnahmen des Fasnachtsumzugs 1937. Am Anfang des Films gibt es eine Schrifttafel „Lahr, die Stadt des hinkenden Boten“. Dieser Name bezieht sich auf den Volkskalender ‚Lahrer Hinkender Bote‘, der ab 1800 erschien und bis heute inzwischen mit dem Untertitel „Der badische Kalender“ veröffentlicht wird. Der Haupttitel bezieht sich darauf, dass um 1800 Invaliden oft nur die Möglichkeit hatten, als Boten oder Zeitungsverkäufer ihr Auskommen zu finden. Der Inhalt besteht aus einem Kalender, Informationen zu Gedenktagen, Pflanz- und Saat-Terminen, Bauernregeln, Pollenflug, dem Hundertjährigen Kalender, landesbezogenen Beiträgen und Geschichten, teilweise in alemannischer Mundart sowie Fotos und Zeichnungen.  
 
|Contexte_et_analyse_de=Der Amateurfilm behandelt zwei unterschiedliche Sujets, die zeitlich getrennt aufgenommen wurden. In der ersten Minute geht es um eine Sportdarbietung von einer Männer- und einer Frauenriege des Turnverein Lahr auf dem Schlossplatz. In der zweiten Minute folgen dann Aufnahmen des Fasnachtsumzugs 1937. Am Anfang des Films gibt es eine Schrifttafel „Lahr, die Stadt des hinkenden Boten“. Dieser Name bezieht sich auf den Volkskalender ‚Lahrer Hinkender Bote‘, der ab 1800 erschien und bis heute inzwischen mit dem Untertitel „Der badische Kalender“ veröffentlicht wird. Der Haupttitel bezieht sich darauf, dass um 1800 Invaliden oft nur die Möglichkeit hatten, als Boten oder Zeitungsverkäufer ihr Auskommen zu finden. Der Inhalt besteht aus einem Kalender, Informationen zu Gedenktagen, Pflanz- und Saat-Terminen, Bauernregeln, Pollenflug, dem Hundertjährigen Kalender, landesbezogenen Beiträgen und Geschichten, teilweise in alemannischer Mundart sowie Fotos und Zeichnungen.  
 
Sportübungen
 
Sportübungen

Revision as of 09:59, 28 April 2020


Sport und Fasnacht
Warning[1]

Events filmed or related


Sportpräsentation und Fasnachstumzug

Abstract


Präsentation von weiblichen und männlichen Sportlern in Lahr. Fasnachtsumzug in Lahr mit Wagen,

Description


ZT: Lahr i.B. die Stadt des "Lahrer Hinkenden Boten" Sportdarbietung in der Stadt vor Möbelhaus Karl Erber, Frauen schwingen Keulen, Männer Kugeln. Abmarsch der Sportler. ZT: Von der Lohrer Fasnet Fasnachtsumzug in Lahr, von erhöhter Position gefilmt. Kamel, Wagen mit Darstellung eines Boxkampfs, Boot mit Aufschrift "Skihaserl".


Metadata

Reference / film number :  LFS00472 1
Date :  1937
Coloration :  Black and white
Sound :  Mute
Running time :  00:02:14
Reel format :  16 mm
Genre :  Amateur movie
Thematics :  Sport, Athletics, Traditions, Carnival
Archive :  Haus des Dokumentarfilms

Context and analysis


he amateur film deals with two different subjects, which were recorded separately. The first minute is about a sports performance by a men and women team from the Lahr gymnastics club on the Schlossplatz. The second minute is followed by recordings of the carnival parade in 1937. At the beginning of the film there is a plaque "Lahr, the city of the limping messenger". This name refers to the folk calendar 'Lahrer Linkender Bote', which appeared from 1800 and has since been published with the subtitle "The Baden Calendar". The main title refers to the fact that around 1800 invalids often only had the opportunity to make a living as messengers or newspaper sellers. The content consists of a calendar, information on memorial days, planting and sowing dates, farmers' rules, pollen count, the centenary calendar, country-specific articles and stories, some in Alemannic dialect, as well as photos and drawings. Sports exercises All recordings of the sports performances took place in today's Schlossplatz from the same position without a tripod. The Karl Erber furniture store, which can be seen in the background, has now become a branch of a drugstore chain and enables localization. Gymnastics became very popular with the advent of the labor movement in the second half of the 19th century. The Lahr gymnastics club was founded in 1846 and is one of the oldest gymnastics clubs in Baden-Württemberg. Today, with almost 2,000 members, it is the largest club that offers sports in Lahr. The young women in short sports dress with the club's logo perform choreographed and synchronized gymnastics and dance exercises with small balls. Afterwards, old men show gymnastic exercises with leather slingshots that they throw at each other. In the background, many children and some adults can be seen as spectators, including a soldier in uniform and a policeman who keeps the youngsters at bay. Some of them are lightly dressed and in combination with the position of the sun and the resulting shadows, the sporting performance can be dated to the midday in spring; the year of admission remains unclear, but will be in the second half of the 1930s. At the end of this sequence, the camera pans from left to right and follows the march of the men with their shouldered balls. Carnival parade The sequence begins with a plaque "Von der Lohrer Fasnet" and shows the move on Sunday, February 7, as evidenced by an article in the Lahrer Zeitung on February 8, 1937: "'So ebbs has never been there!' Flow of people, which rolled from the whole circle into the official city of the Lahr Fasentzunft, clogged the streets long before the Fasentzug through the main street of the city led its huge queue of wit and satire through. " The article makes it clear that many clubs and music groups from Lahr and the neighboring towns participated in the move. Not all of the numbers the article mentions are documented in the very short film of less than a minute. The amateur filmmaker with his 16 mm camera has chosen an elevated position and lets the train pass him by. The images are somewhat blurred. The film was shot without a tripod and cut in the camera, so to speak, by stopping it and starting it again on the next subject.

You can see the Klepperlesgard, the city chapel and the civil militia Lahr, which were closely connected to the carnival. This was followed by the guild council on a gala car and a motive car to tunnel the Schutterlindenberg. Two of them are walking in camel costumes, which the article comments: "'When an grass has finally grown over an old thing, a camel will surely come running that will tear everything down again' - the 'Liederkranz' Lahr embodied the sewerage concerns of the population." (LZ, 8.2.1937). A ring is built on another car, in which two boxers fight with each other. Reference was made to the fight of the German boxing star Max Schmeling against Joe Jacobs on June 19, 1936 in New York, which the German won after twelve rounds. Under the motto "If we don't have snow, we go to sea", the ski club on the ship 'Skihaserl' enjoyed itself. The main street is densely filled with audiences, which are mostly not disguised except for the children. This can be attributed to the fact that this move was only the second official one in Lahr. Before that, the fools mostly celebrated in closed rooms, because at the beginning of the 20th century Lahr was predominantly Protestant and the carnival was officially prohibited. Nevertheless, a move was secretly carried out in what was then "Kriz-Gass", today's Gärtnerstrasse, and the community tolerated it. In 1936, the first official carnival parade was carried out in Lahr. Patrizia Danielczok, Alexander Just, Keshia-Magali Kaltenbrunner, Jenny Wybierski

Places and monuments


Lahr

Bibliography


N.N., Der Fasnachtssonntag in der Schutterstadt“, Lahrer Zeitung, Nr. 32, 8.2.1937; Lahrer Hinkender Bote: http://www.lahrer-hinkender-bote.de/ (Aufruf: 24.4.2020); Lahrer Narrenzunft, Vom Mittelalter in die Neuzeit: https://www.lahrer-narrenzunft.de/zunft/geschichte (Aufruf: 10.01.2020); Turnverein Lahr 1864: https://www.turnverein-lahr.de/



  1. This film analysis is still in progress. It may therefore be incomplete and contain errors.